What Killed American Literature?

I didn’t know it was dead…see The Wall Street Journal.

The Editors of “The Cambridge History of the American Novel” decided to consider their subject—as history is considered increasingly in universities these days—from the bottom up. In 71 chapters, the book’s contributors consider the traditional novel in its many sub-forms, among them: science fiction, eco-fiction, crime and mystery novels, Jewish novels, Asian-American novels, African-American novels, war novels, postmodern novels, feminist novels, suburban novels, children’s novels, non-fiction novels, graphic novels and novels of disability (“We cannot truly know a culture until we ask its disabled citizens to describe, analyze, and interpret it,” write the authors of a chapter titled “Disability and the American Novel”). Other chapters are about subjects played out in novels—for instance, ethnic and immigrant themes—and still others about publishers, book clubs, discussion groups and a good deal else. “The Cambridge History of the Novel,” in short, provides full-court-press coverage.

“In short,” though, is perhaps the least apt phase for a tome that runs to 1,244 pages and requires a forklift to hoist onto one’s lap. All that the book’s editors left out is why it is important or even pleasurable to read novels and how it is that some novels turn out to be vastly better than others…. (Emphasis mine)

Perhaps literature dies with too much analysis.

 

 

 

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